Sunday, December 16, 2007

Adam Fuss.

Adam Fuss. Photographs by Adam Fuss. Text by Thomas Kellein. Distributed Art Publishers, New York, 2003. 112 pp., 114 color illustrations, 6¾x9½".

"This is a handsome little book which serves as a catalogue to an exhibition of Fuss’ work at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. The essay by Thomas Kellein begins as a recitation of chronological facts: that Fuss was born in London in 1961; that he was sent to live with a maternal grandmother in Australia, away from his parents after his father suffered a stroke in 1963; that he spent many childhood hours outdoors and alone; that he loved the diversity of nature and saw William Blake as a spiritual father of sorts. But this chronology acts as preparation for an in-depth exploration (realized in dialogue with Fuss) of the symbology rife in Fuss' images. There are snakes, ripples, birds, evidence of movement, shadows, and silhouettes, all traced sans camera directly onto photographic paper. This is difficult territory to navigate, and every competent author will bring a different set of worthy interpretations to the table; Kellein's approach is well worth the reading. The reproductions are crisp and rich, sitting on a medium weight glossy paper; the images hold to consistent dimensions throughout the book, which, combined with substantial white borders, is greatly appreciated."

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